Grounded theory and the "no talk" rule

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Grounded theory and the "no talk" rule

Postby lingua_franca » Sat Aug 26, 2017 11:12 pm

Has anyone here used grounded theory? I'm looking for detailed discussions of the "no talk" rule, but I can't find much, as grounded theorists seem to have a morbid horror of referencing correctly from what I can see. I don't even know where to start looking in Glaser's haystack. Any book or article recommendations that deal with this aspect of GT would be welcome!
"Suppose a tree fell down, Pooh, when we were underneath it?"
"Suppose it didn't," said Pooh, after careful thought.
Piglet was comforted by this.
- A.A. Milne.
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Re: Grounded theory and the "no talk" rule

Postby CatFace » Wed Sep 06, 2017 12:31 pm

Ugh, the no talk rule. I used grounded theory for my major research project and remember not being able to find much on this topic either. From what I remember there is a bit about it in this book (which I found really v helpful when I was doing the work):

Urquhart, C. (2012). Grounded theory for qualitative research: A practical guide. Sage.

Can I ask what this is for? Are you running a GT project?
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Re: Grounded theory and the "no talk" rule

Postby lingua_franca » Wed Sep 06, 2017 2:17 pm

I am. This is a postdoctoral project, but I'm a novice to grounded theory, as for my PhD I used IPA. The principle of not talking was the thing that made me particularly interested in using GT this time round. I'm looking at grassroots processes of reconciliation after political violence, with fieldwork in several fragile settings, and the decision not to talk is often a big part of people's lives - how the violent past is spoken about, when, where, and with whom...and if. In the humanitarian literature there are some critiques of Western psychologists and aid workers importing the idea that to talk is always beneficial, whereas people living with intergenerational trauma and the aftermath of mass violence would often dispute that. I thought that adopting an approach that stresses the fruitful nature of silence might produce some new insights - I like my methods to be congruent with my topic whenever possible. But so little seems to have been written on this specific thing! I've read Urquhart's book but I was looking for something a bit more in-depth. I've had a few recommendations now from more experienced researchers, so hopefully it should work out OK. If not, I'll just have to write something myself when the study is over. :)
"Suppose a tree fell down, Pooh, when we were underneath it?"
"Suppose it didn't," said Pooh, after careful thought.
Piglet was comforted by this.
- A.A. Milne.
lingua_franca
 
Posts: 727
Joined: Tue Sep 14, 2010 11:29 pm

Re: Grounded theory and the "no talk" rule

Postby CatFace » Wed Sep 06, 2017 2:29 pm

Sounds wonderfully interesting - please do write something. I loved using GT for that exact reason, and it would be great if people added more to the literature around the methodology. And then send it to me ;)
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