Anxiety and asthma

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Anxiety and asthma

Postby mazzz123 » Tue Apr 25, 2017 9:02 am

Hi all,
Does anyone have any resources for working with older children / young adolescents around managing anxiety during asthma attacks? It's actually for the child of a colleague, rather than clinical work, but I thought you folks might know! She has mild asthma, but gets very anxious when she feels wheezy, creating a viscous cycle. Any webpages / work sheets etc v gratefully received!

Thanks in advance,

Mazzz
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Re: Anxiety and asthma

Postby MindfulPsych » Thu Sep 28, 2017 3:56 pm

mazzz123 wrote:Hi all,
Does anyone have any resources for working with older children / young adolescents around managing anxiety during asthma attacks? It's actually for the child of a colleague, rather than clinical work, but I thought you folks might know! She has mild asthma, but gets very anxious when she feels wheezy, creating a viscous cycle. Any webpages / work sheets etc v gratefully received!

Thanks in advance,

Mazzz


Hi Mazz, I just realised how late my response is to you.. I'm guessing you might got this sorted now?

I would read up on asthma UK's website - very helpful tips around asthma and anxiety but also how anxiety can produce very similar symptoms. Normally, when we become wheezy, we start to think potentially "what if it's another asthma attack?", leading to feelings of anxious, linking to physical symptoms normally breathing changes which can lead to worrying and also hyperventilating. When we hyperventilate it causes us to breath more deeply (not deep belly breathing!!) meaning we use more oxygen which causes us to then feel we're not getting enough air and we begin to panic. I'm thinking that possibly deep belly breathing exercises and relaxation may help in this situation. It does take practice but can be really helpful with individuals who have asthma. Alternatively, using a thought/worry diary may also help. You can find some great ones up on the internet.

I do hope this helps - do they have an asthma alert card? You can get them for free from an asthma nurse or even from asthma UK I think. They can be helpful in keeping us calm when we become wheezy but also if an asthma attack happens it can be helpful to hand to someone so they know what to do. The asthma alert cards can be used for any severity of asthma.

Hope this helps a little!
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