Trainee PWP and work/life balance

This section is for discussion relating to the Layard report, and subsequent schemes like Improving Access to Psychological Therapies where lower intensity inteventions are offered in primary care

Trainee PWP and work/life balance

Postby N400Effect » Tue Jan 16, 2018 9:58 pm

Evening all :)

I have been offered an interview for a trainee PWP post and I am extremely excited about it. I wanted to ask what your experience is of the work/life balance?

I have a nearly 5 year old that is in her first year at school and a 15 month old. I just wanted to see how people managed and whether there was a lot of weekend work involved or whether people managed to get majority done in the week?

Also, the one I have applied for states there will be at least one evening clinic per week (5-8pm). Will this be from 9am or would the start time therefore be later too?

I went back to work full time after my first in a stressful role and I am currently part time after my second but ready to go back to full time now. Would just appreciate your experience and what trust you were involved with.

Thank you everyone!
N400Effect
 
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Re: Trainee PWP and work/life balance

Postby MindfulPsych » Tue Jan 16, 2018 10:35 pm

N400Effect wrote:Evening all :)

I have been offered an interview for a trainee PWP post and I am extremely excited about it. I wanted to ask what your experience is of the work/life balance?

I have a nearly 5 year old that is in her first year at school and a 15 month old. I just wanted to see how people managed and whether there was a lot of weekend work involved or whether people managed to get majority done in the week?

Also, the one I have applied for states there will be at least one evening clinic per week (5-8pm). Will this be from 9am or would the start time therefore be later too?

I went back to work full time after my first in a stressful role and I am currently part time after my second but ready to go back to full time now. Would just appreciate your experience and what trust you were involved with.

Thank you everyone!


Hello and congratulations!

I don't know of anyone who has completed work on the weekends in my service but i would always say seek support and advice if you find things are getting on top of you - your university work (which runs alongside the PWP trainee role) will be completed on the weekends if you don't get study time in the week.

I believe that normally if you were to run an evening clinic and finish at 8pmn then you would start at 12pm rather than 9am (might be best to check this with your service as it might vary)

Good luck and enjoy it, it is a difficult year but it has some perks to it too! My advice would definetly be; try to be as organised as you can and ask for help and support :D

(we had a buddy system where a trainee is paired with a qualified PWP who supports them during the year... your service might have this too!)
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Re: Trainee PWP and work/life balance

Postby xashx » Fri Jan 19, 2018 4:46 pm

Congratulations and good luck!

In my experience it's all about good time management and using gaps in your diary for purposeful activity. On my course we were given the self-directed study day tasks at the very beginning of each module, so in my experience I found it useful to identify some of the easier pieces of work, e.g. 1000 word report or short personal development plans, and to complete these when I had 'free time' between patients or if they had DNA'd, providing I had done all of my clinical admin tasks. This definitely relieved some of the pressure on study days, and I know this method won't be suited to everyone, but I have heard of services reducing the number of study days to meet service need, so I think it's about being proactive and anticipating this.

There is a lot of academic work involved, I won't lie, but it is manageable, and also it helps if it's something you enjoy. Also, a year is not a long time - I think it equates to about 9 months at university in total, so in the grand scheme of things I think it's very do-able, then you can always decrease your hours when qualified.

I do agree with the above post however, make sure you seek support if it's getting too much - I know that my university were quite flexible with submission dates, or start times of lectures given the right circumstances and there was a valid reason to defer the submission. Personally I managed to go on 5 holidays during the duration of the course, and had a very busy year in my personal life, plus working weekends as a Bank HCA to gain further experience in different fields, and I managed to keep my cool and pass the course. It's do-able, in short.

Good luck with the interview!
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