Training in Clinical Psychology too stressful?

Your chance to ask for advice on any aspect of career development that doesn't fit in any of the above categories

Training in Clinical Psychology too stressful?

Postby ManonFire » Fri Nov 10, 2017 7:57 pm

I am wondering what people's thoughts are on undertaking training when managing a long term condition that is exacerbated by stress. Such as a condition of the heart, etc.
Would you seek an alternative career and give up?
ManonFire
 
Posts: 16
Joined: Tue Oct 17, 2017 10:45 pm

Re: Training in Clinical Psychology too stressful?

Postby sweetpea » Sun Nov 12, 2017 5:33 pm

I'm finding it really difficult to answer this, because so much depends on your own personal circumstances.

Yes, training is stressful, but I don't think a long term condition should automatically exclude you from pursuing it, no. That said, only you can know for yourself whether you have the physical capacity to manage. Perhaps it's worth considering some of the following:

- Does your long term condition generally allow you to work full time / study / commute, etc?
- What are your support systems like? Are they adequate enough to help you through the three years?
- What is your general tolerance of stress like? Is there room to work on this prior to training?
- Have you looked into what support may be available through the course / uni / NHS whilst on training?

Personally, I'm two months in to training and I'm glad I didn't give up. That said, I have had to accept that I won't know how my health will be from one day / week / month / year to the next, and that compromises will have to be made along the way. My course expects me to be very open with them about how I'm managing, so we can troubleshoot difficulties early. Having those very honest conversations and asserting my needs isn't always comfortable, but reflexivity is such a huge part of training, so that's not something you would be alone in.

TL;DR - Look into the practicalities of what training involves and be honest with yourself about what you can / can't cope with, but don't give up if it's something you're really passionate about.
User avatar
sweetpea
 
Posts: 134
Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2014 5:39 pm

Re: Training in Clinical Psychology too stressful?

Postby ManonFire » Thu Nov 16, 2017 12:57 am

Really thoughtful answer Sweetpea, sounds like you know what you're talking about and well done to you managing it in what must be a difficult environemnt. I think about some of the settings I've worked in before that have been very very stressful and others not stressful at all. I think about what my colleagues or line manager would've said to me should I have said sorry I'm quite stressed and tried to explain about my health. Actually on one occasion I did explain and my boss didn't actually make any allowances for me and if anything made things more difficult that day, asking me to do a presentation at short notice that they could've done.
I'm not sure about being open about it with the course tutors, accessing this damned course is so razor competitive that I wouldn't want to jeopardise my chances in any way. I remember when I raised it with that previous boss I felt as if I was making excuses or shunning work afterwards, which is very far from my working ethic. Still, it would be silly to wind up on a course and in a position where I was clearly unwell and nobody around me having a clue how to help.
Maybe I'll cross the bridge when I get to it, so to speak.
ManonFire
 
Posts: 16
Joined: Tue Oct 17, 2017 10:45 pm

Re: Training in Clinical Psychology too stressful?

Postby miriam » Sun Nov 19, 2017 12:40 am

You need to raise it in the occupational health section, which should not be used to discriminate against you, but to make adaptations to make the role possible for you. It is really unhealthy and unwise to hide things like this.
Miriam

See my blog at http://clinpsyeye.wordpress.com
User avatar
miriam
Site Admin
 
Posts: 7261
Joined: Sat Mar 24, 2007 11:20 pm
Location: Bucks


Return to Careers advice

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests