EMDR training

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Pink
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Re: EMDR training

Post by Pink » Sat Apr 18, 2015 9:16 am

Yes please Bluegoat!

Thanks Pink
Kintsukuroi: 'to repair with gold'. the art of repairing pottery with gold or silver lacquer and understanding that the piece is more beautiful for having been broken.

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hettie
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Re: EMDR training

Post by hettie » Sat Apr 18, 2015 1:28 pm

I have exactly the same dilemma and so would love to hear where others trained (and what they thought of it)

icebluesparkles
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Re: EMDR training

Post by icebluesparkles » Sat Apr 18, 2015 6:20 pm

I trained at EMDR Training UK and it was excellent. Sorry if that's not okay to put on the forum- please let me know for future reference. Feel free to PM if you want more detail - although it was 3 years ago that I did it.

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Pink
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Re: EMDR training

Post by Pink » Sat Apr 18, 2015 9:19 pm

That's really useful to hear Icebluesparkles, thank you. I've been looking at her website but no mention of prices which is a bit anxiety-provoking-I know as an investment it'll be worth it in the long-term but money is tight just now. I've heard really good things about her from colleagues as well though and saw her speak at a conference a while ago-thought she was very good.

thank you

Pink
Kintsukuroi: 'to repair with gold'. the art of repairing pottery with gold or silver lacquer and understanding that the piece is more beautiful for having been broken.

@Sushipink22

astra
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Re: EMDR training

Post by astra » Mon Apr 20, 2015 2:02 pm

I trained with Michael Patterson at EMDR Masterclass and it was truly excellent. As an experienced psychologist working with complex trauma for many years prior to my EMDR training, I would say the impact of EMDR on my work has been nothing short of revolutionary. Scottybottybanana, you clearly have some strong views on the topic, but I'm wondering what your evidence for this position is. There is a wealth of good research data and EMDR is in the NICE Guidelines, which whilst it is not necessarily proof of anything, does suggest that the evidence has been subjected to rigorous appraisal.

The best evidence for me is in the difference it makes to my clients, but prior to training, I also undertook some sessions myself with a trained therapist on some of my own past trauma stuff and it took me to places I had managed to avoid and defend against in every other type of therapy I've ever had, it was much harder to resist the emotional connection whilst watching a moving beam of light than when just talking about stuff. I still don't really know how the eye movement helps, but it really does (and it doesn't have to be eye movement, any alternating bilateral sensory stimulation works, such as tapping alternate sides of the body or auditory sounds played in alternate ears, even smells passed under each nostril in turn).

I don't feel discredited for using EMDR, I feel empowered by it as I can help many more people than I could without it.
From the point of view of mindfulness, as long as you're breathing there's more right with you than wrong with you. Jon Kabat-Zinn

astra
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Re: EMDR training

Post by astra » Mon Apr 20, 2015 3:40 pm

oops, I've just realised the time lag between the older posts on this thread and the newer ones! Oh well, what I've said still stands!
From the point of view of mindfulness, as long as you're breathing there's more right with you than wrong with you. Jon Kabat-Zinn

reefflex
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Re: EMDR training

Post by reefflex » Mon Apr 20, 2015 4:07 pm

I second the recommendation for Sandi Richman's training - her courses are consistely highly rated.

In terms of the evidence base, the problem is that while there is good evidence for the efficacy of EMDR therapy for PTSD, the claimed underlying mechanisms do not stack up; particularly the idea of "integrating left and right brain processes".

I can recall first questioning the whole theoretical rationale when I was taught in day 2 of EMDR 1, to use vertical eye movements to enhance processing when horizontal ones werent working - to me this suggestion just spoke of how ridiculous the theoretical rationale was, yet it seemed to happily sit in the mind of the trainer without critique.

We know enough about the brain to know that the idea of separating out brain processes by lateralization is ridiculously over simplistic and just doesnt stack up to, say, fMRI data. So the problem I always had was that when you come to "sell" EMDR to the patient, you are taught to give what, in my mind, amounts to a "snake oil" explanation for it, that I could just never deliver with a straight face or honest heart.

I also struggle with therapists using EMDR for anything apart from PTSD, as there is little or no evidence in any other condition.

Nevertheless there is evidence that for PTSD, the effect of EMDR is more than just the exposure element, and that the eye movements do add a unique contribution:

http://www.emdr.com/faqs/36-what-has-re ... onent.html

Recently there have been very interesting laboratory studies about the effect of taxing visiospatial working memory while recalling distressing memories, and how this causes them to reduce in vividness and distress

http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j& ... 1109,d.ZWU

These studies have, I think, given something much more believable with which to "sell" the treatment. Interestingly they also give some novel results:

- that tapping and bleeps are not as effective as eye movements
- that direction of eye movements is irrelevant, rather than speed/complexity to follow
- that you shoudnt use eye movemnts in the positive installation phase as this would actually weaken, not strenghten it
- that you can use other tasks, such as trail making or complex figure drawing, or focusing on breathing, or playing tetris, instead of eye movements

So potentially you could just add these in to the reliving component of trauma-focused CBT to enhance it - a study waiting to happen!

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HedleyLamarr
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Re: EMDR training

Post by HedleyLamarr » Mon Apr 20, 2015 9:47 pm

EMDR is a good example of an evidence-based but not science-based treatment. And as far as I know, there isn't any evidence to suggest it is more effective than CBT.
My mind is aglow with whirling, transient nodes of thought careening through a cosmic vapor of invention.

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