Living in the UK

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natmahony
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Living in the UK

Post by natmahony » Wed Oct 22, 2014 11:27 pm

Hello everyone!

This may seem like a really strange question, but I am currently undertaking my qualifications in Australia (however, I'm from Europe) and want to know if living and working in the UK as a clinical psychologist is 'good' (for want of a better word!). e.g affordability of a home, leisure pursuits etc.

I've visited the UK numerous times and honestly don't think there's anywhere better! :D

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miriam
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Re: Living in the UK

Post by miriam » Thu Oct 23, 2014 12:36 am

The UK has one of the highest costs of living anywhere in the world. Property, especially in London, is massively more expensive than just about anywhere except for Singapore and Tokyo. Salaries by comparison don't go as far. Our terms and conditions are better than in the USA (typically 4 weeks leave, free healthcare and protection against unemployment) but not as good as much of Europe and certainly nothing compared to Scandinavia.

There is a huge amount of regional variation within the UK though. In most of wales, the north east and north west, properties of £100-200K exist that would cost five times that in hot spots like London, Surrey and the south east (also Oxford, Bristol). Trendy parts of northern towns like Leeds and Manchester are also expensive.

Leisure pursuits also vary. A gym membership for an adult, for example, might range from £25/month somewhere cheap to upwards of £70. A meal in a restaurant from £20 per head to upwards of £80. Running a car costs about £2000/year in depreciation and insurance, and fuel is about £1.40/litre. In terms of food, bread is currently about £1.80 per loaf, milk is about 60p per pint. A chocolate bar is about 80p. Beer is about £1 for 330ml in a shop, triple that in a pub, and twice that again in a restaurant.

Salaries in clinical psychology are approximately: £15k for a graduate post, £19-23k as an assistant psychologist, £25-28 as a trainee, £30-45k as a qualified CP, £55-75 if you make consultant grade.

You can get some tables comparing the cost of living between different countries.

In practical terms you'd need the legal right to live and work here, and your qualifications would not be automatically accepted, so expect to have lots of paperwork and time to be told where you fit in to our system, and no guarantee that a clinical psychology qualification from Australia will allow you to register and practise as a qualified CP here.
Miriam

See my blog at http://clinpsyeye.wordpress.com

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enid
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Re: Living in the UK

Post by enid » Thu Oct 23, 2014 9:02 am

However, your opinion is widely held; that there is nowhere better. I live in London and have many, many foreign friends, who absolutely love it here - despite, the living costs. They do get you down sometimes...but London is particularly bad... SOOO much more expensive than everywhere else, I have been doing a lot of research recently on this. You get London weighting, so salaries are a tiny bit higher, but it is an absolutely fantastic place to live, and quality of life is what you make it. England has some beautiful countryside, for e.g.., for weekends away and things. I am ridiculously poor on a 16k stipend, but get to do all the things I enjoy, aside from the level of holidaying I am used to!

natmahony
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Joined: Wed Oct 22, 2014 11:52 am

Re: Living in the UK

Post by natmahony » Tue Oct 28, 2014 3:14 am

Thanks for the replies! Really helpful. :)

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