Burnout in colleagues

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hawke
Posts: 77
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2017 11:10 am

Burnout in colleagues

Post by hawke » Wed Jul 18, 2018 1:43 pm

I have noticed a senior colleague at work seems burnt out. The service is going through a tough time as a whole, but even more than others, they seem very over-worked and focused purely on the targets with minimal visible compassion for clients or staff. I don't have any dealings with them directly, but I think I am seeing the impact on others in my team - I'm seeing/hearing a lot of stress and tears, but there are also big increases in staff sickness, staff leaving, and staff failing university assignments.

I have passed on my concerns to my own line manager and another colleague more closely involved, but have not directly approached the burnt out colleague as we don't have a close professional or personal relationship.

I'd be really interested to hear what others might consider doing in this situation. While I am obviously concerned about that individual staff member, I am also very concerned about the contagion effect within my team as a whole.

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NotReally
Posts: 42
Joined: Sat Apr 14, 2018 2:14 pm

Re: Burnout in colleagues

Post by NotReally » Tue Jul 24, 2018 2:41 pm

I think there is something to be said, and considered, about the fact this is a senior colleague. It is likely they have faced this situation before, whether in this service or another. It may very well be a method they use to get through what sounds like a tough time professionally.

Given that you don't have a close personal or professional relationship with them, i'm not sure there is much more you can do. Alerting your line manager is the right thing to do from your point of view, I feel. I'd be very surprised if others who know the staff member better and regularly work with them haven't noticed the change tbh, and they will probably have a word with them about it. If not, you've alerted your line manager, and inevitably discussions will be had at management level and someone will presumably have a word if they feel it necessary.

hawke
Posts: 77
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2017 11:10 am

Re: Burnout in colleagues

Post by hawke » Wed Jul 25, 2018 7:20 pm

Thanks for this reply. It certainly made me reconsider my assumption of burnout being a bad thing, rather than perhaps a necessary temporary response to a tough situation that ultimately means you can survive in the NHS for the long-term.

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