How do you dress for work?

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bluegoat
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Re: How do you dress for work?

Post by bluegoat » Sun Oct 12, 2014 9:05 pm

I have an electronic copy of the article if anyone wants it! Can I post a dropbox link on here?

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Kentucky_Freud_Chicken
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Re:

Post by Kentucky_Freud_Chicken » Sun Oct 12, 2014 9:56 pm

Tiggerman wrote:Interesting responses :) So anything really, within reason. Does anyone wear suits??
I do when I'm representing the company I work for during peer reviews and external referrals (no tie-usually not allowed due to security anyway.). If the patients see me in one they all make jokes about it though so suit trousers and a shirt normally.

bluegoat
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Re: How do you dress for work?

Post by bluegoat » Mon Oct 13, 2014 7:11 am


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ell
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Re: How do you dress for work?

Post by ell » Mon Oct 13, 2014 11:11 am

enid wrote:I know one of the London courses is quite particular about this - and seeing as one tends to work and live in the location (as it's so easy to do so, rent not so bad, etc.) they also specify when walking around the neighbourhood generally one should dress smartly and not in jeans, in case one sees a client/patient in the street. I must say I take a quite conservative view on work attire too and think smart or smart casual is the best bet. For myself I feel much more comfortable if I am covered and quite conservative, esp. on the ward....kind of want to look neutral. A patient once commented on my boots - which were totally Clarks style, flat, but came to below my knees, albeit with a loose long skirt, and it made me fee a bit uncomfortable.
(bold emphasis mine)

Am I understanding this correctly? One of the London courses are saying that trainees should not wear jeans out and about for the 3 years of their training? What?! I really wanted to do clinical training, but I would never have applied to a course where they tried to dictate what I wore outside of working hours.

lingua_franca
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Re: How do you dress for work?

Post by lingua_franca » Mon Oct 13, 2014 11:22 am

ell wrote:
enid wrote:I know one of the London courses is quite particular about this - and seeing as one tends to work and live in the location (as it's so easy to do so, rent not so bad, etc.) they also specify when walking around the neighbourhood generally one should dress smartly and not in jeans, in case one sees a client/patient in the street. I must say I take a quite conservative view on work attire too and think smart or smart casual is the best bet. For myself I feel much more comfortable if I am covered and quite conservative, esp. on the ward....kind of want to look neutral. A patient once commented on my boots - which were totally Clarks style, flat, but came to below my knees, albeit with a loose long skirt, and it made me fee a bit uncomfortable.
(bold emphasis mine)

Am I understanding this correctly? One of the London courses are saying that trainees should not wear jeans out and about for the 3 years of their training? What?! I really wanted to do clinical training, but I would never have applied to a course where they tried to dictate what I wore outside of working hours.
That sounds a bit strange to me too. After all, quite a few clinical psychologists live locally to where they work, and it would be a bit much to ask that they always go about smartly dressed just in case they bump into a client in Tesco!
"Suppose a tree fell down, Pooh, when we were underneath it?"
"Suppose it didn't," said Pooh, after careful thought.
Piglet was comforted by this.
- A.A. Milne.

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enid
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Re: How do you dress for work?

Post by enid » Mon Oct 13, 2014 3:17 pm

That was just what I heard. I think what they meant was on teaching days, to not wear jeans as you might see a client or patient in the street.

astra
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Re: How do you dress for work?

Post by astra » Mon Oct 13, 2014 5:38 pm

Why would it matter if a patient saw you in the street in casual clothes. For all they know it's your day off and what you wear out and about is nothing to do with them. And why would they care?
From the point of view of mindfulness, as long as you're breathing there's more right with you than wrong with you. Jon Kabat-Zinn

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enid
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Re: How do you dress for work?

Post by enid » Mon Oct 13, 2014 7:23 pm

No clue - seemed a ridiculous thing to worry about.

lingua_franca
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Re: How do you dress for work?

Post by lingua_franca » Mon Oct 13, 2014 7:27 pm

I had some additional thoughts about 'neutral' or professional dress today when I was reading through some notes I made about a nursing home and community service for Holocaust survivors who have dementia. In that service the staff are encouraged to dress colourfully and casually, in their own personal style, as anything resembling a uniform could trigger frightening memories and associations for the service users. (Some service users find hospital stays very difficult because of the nurses' uniforms.) Obviously it is rare for someone to have a concentration camp in their past, but it does make me wonder if some people - inpatients especially - might not find a uniform (even an 'unofficial' one, such as dark trousers and sober shirts) to be intimidating or just dispiriting. I did some HCA shifts on a psych ward that felt drained of all life - bland walls, no real colour anywhere, no garden, and it felt like the brightest spot was my own red woolly jumper. I understand the need to be professional in our appearance, but I think that professionalism should be more about making service users feel at ease than about black trousers.
"Suppose a tree fell down, Pooh, when we were underneath it?"
"Suppose it didn't," said Pooh, after careful thought.
Piglet was comforted by this.
- A.A. Milne.

faz121
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Re: How do you dress for work?

Post by faz121 » Mon Oct 13, 2014 7:59 pm

I think Enid is talking about the IoP course, but please correct me if I'm wrong.... IoP does ask trainees to dress smart/casual whilst on the campus. This is because IoP teaching facilities are based at Denmark Hill where the Maudsley is and where a lot of trainees have placements too. As it is all one huge site, trainees are advised to think about this. However they don't go around policing what people wear! I think it's more a case of not being dressed inappropriately (short skirts, surfing shorts etc) Mon to Fri when on site.

Hope this helps (apologies for any typos as posted in a rush on phone)

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schizometric
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Re: How do you dress for work?

Post by schizometric » Mon Oct 13, 2014 11:36 pm

I wear the more casual side of smart casual too... Dress with leggings and shoes in summer or dress with cardi, tights and boots in the winter!! Unless interviewing on either side... But to be honest the most recent interview I went to the 8d wore jeans and a t shirt. My closest colleague often wears smart clothes like a suit jacket and possibly gains more respect on first impression? Maybe? I'm not too fussed about it though. Again as long as it isn't inappropriate (low cut top or short dress/skirt etc) and not plain scruffy (shirt untucked, stained, buttoned up wrong) then I'm not too fussy.
Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind.

julimoendchen
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Re:

Post by julimoendchen » Thu Aug 20, 2015 2:56 pm

This is an old post, but I just had to comment on this one! You just made my day:
Funny! I'd wear more trousers if I had the figure for them
I haven't worn jeans since I'm like 15ish. I just feel more comfortable in dresses and skirts. I work in a school and as I'm still quite young (22) but barely look 18 (I'm still getting asked for my ID on nights out :( ), so I feel I need to dress in a way, that is not 'too authoritative' but also creates a little distance between myself and the students, if you know what I mean.

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Re: How do you dress for work?

Post by julimoendchen » Thu Aug 20, 2015 3:26 pm

mr_tippy wrote:Has anyone actively experimented with their dress? Obviously there's nothing scientific going on here, but I'm wondering if anyone feels clients responded differently to them, or they felt they carried something different with more formal/casual dress? And if there were any advantages or disadvantages of each?
I did. I should probably start off by saying that I'm still quite young (22), and look even younger. When I started working (part-time next to my studies) as an Educational Consultant two years ago, I first wore jeans and trousers, as everybody else was. But I kept being mistaken for students and sometimes new employees would refuse to let me leave the school because they thought I was a student trying to skip classes. Also new students were slightly confused when I came into their classroom asking them to come with me. So eventually I started wearing dresses and skirt to work, nobody was confused anymore and I felt that I was treated with much more respect than before. Some people, who have only met the 'dresses and skirt' me thought that I was much older and didn't even believe I was a student anymore.

So, I do believe that what you are wearing has a big impact on the way people perceive us.

I vaguely remember that there was even an experiment I read about a while ago, where they dressed up homeless people and asked a pannel what profession they believed the person was in. Needless to say that nobody thought they were homeless, wearing a suit and fancy clothes.

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