News report: Care for those who self-harm needs improving...

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hannahb83
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News report: Care for those who self-harm needs improving...

Post by hannahb83 » Fri Jun 28, 2013 2:05 pm

Today a story in the news states that those whom are submitted to hospital for self-harming, are often met by judgmental/negative attitudes from staff members.

As well as this, Professor Nav Kapur estimates that "Probably only about six in 10 people that come into hospital get a good quality assessment."

I'm interested to know what you all think about this as I haven't yet started working in the NHS.
Have you yourselves experienced judgmental attitudes towards these patients from other NHS staff you've worked with?
Do you agree with Prof Kapur's estimate? (I'm assuming this will depend on the region)

Here is the link to the article: http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/23088998

Let me know your thoughts! Thanks :)
"Men are disturbed, not by things, but by the principles and notions which they form concerning things" - Epictetus

Beth1
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Re: News report: Care for those who self-harm needs improvin

Post by Beth1 » Fri Jun 28, 2013 2:58 pm

Hi Hannah. I used to work as a SW in a women's unit and regularly had to take women to A&E following self harm. I would say that the attitude of staff ranged from empathic to downright hostile. I do appreciate, however, that for overworked hospital staff, dealing with distressed patients who would love to be well, it must be frustrating to see people with self inficted wounds. I think there is a need to educate care staff on helpful responses to self harm. I often used to wonder whether some people felt that if they were kind to the patients who self harmed, that this would reinforce the behaviour; when in reality, their negative attitudes served to reinforce the client's negative view of themselves.

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Pink
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Re: News report: Care for those who self-harm needs improvin

Post by Pink » Sun Jun 30, 2013 4:27 pm

Hi Hannah,

This is a subject that has been around in the S/H field for a number of years, and the awesome Keith Hawton

http://cebmh.warne.ox.ac.uk/csr/keith.html

has done some really good research

http://www.ghpjournal.com/article/S0163 ... 9/abstract

around this topic that has been used to inform the NICE guidelines

http://www.nice.org.uk/cg16

in order to prevent the kind of punishing response you are discussing. The links I've posted a worth a read, but be warned-I disappear into the literature for days once I start, it's such a fascinating area and important topic. I have a feeling there are also 'fill in the blanks' letters online from some of the self-harm service user led organisations that people can take to hospital with them so that they can ask for what they need without having to speak.

hope that helps,

Pink
Kintsukuroi: 'to repair with gold'. the art of repairing pottery with gold or silver lacquer and understanding that the piece is more beautiful for having been broken.

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Will
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Re: News report: Care for those who self-harm needs improvin

Post by Will » Sun Jun 30, 2013 9:47 pm

It's also worth checking out some of the materials around harm minimisation responses, which have developed out of the culture of negative attitudes towards people who self-harm. This book is ace - http://www.amazon.co.uk/Beyond-Fear-Con ... nimisation and if you google some of the work that Kay Inkle has done you'll come across loads of great stuff. 'Cutting The Risk' by Louise Pembroke (on behalf of the Self Harm Network) is also a really good read.

I'm really interested in how professionals respond to self-harm and am doing my research project into looking at this in relation to adolescents. Sorry for the thread hijack but I'd be really grateful for any research anyone is aware of specifically focusing on young people :)
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hiccup
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Re: News report: Care for those who self-harm needs improvin

Post by hiccup » Sun Jun 30, 2013 10:20 pm

Beth1 wrote:Hi Hannah. I used to work as a SW in a women's unit and regularly had to take women to A&E following self harm. I would say that the attitude of staff ranged from empathic to downright hostile. I do appreciate, however, that for overworked hospital staff, dealing with distressed patients who would love to be well, it must be frustrating to see people with self inficted wounds. I think there is a need to educate care staff on helpful responses to self harm. I often used to wonder whether some people felt that if they were kind to the patients who self harmed, that this would reinforce the behaviour; when in reality, their negative attitudes served to reinforce the client's negative view of themselves.

"distressed patients who would love to be well" - are you suggesting patients who self harm do not fit into this description?
If the person you are talking to doesn't appear to be listening, be patient. It may simply be that he has a small piece of fluff in his ear.
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Beth1
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Re: News report: Care for those who self-harm needs improvin

Post by Beth1 » Mon Jul 01, 2013 8:39 am

Hi Hiccup. You're right, I worded that badly. I didn't mean that. I'm on a smartphone though so struggling to tap out a better worded response...

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Campion
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Re: News report: Care for those who self-harm needs improvin

Post by Campion » Tue Jul 02, 2013 12:18 pm

Beth1 wrote:Hi Hiccup. You're right, I worded that badly. I didn't mean that. I'm on a smartphone though so struggling to tap out a better worded response...
Of course you didn't mean it that way and few people would have actually read it that way inside the context of that paragraph. :roll:




Campion.
'Think how many blameless lives are brightened by the blazing indiscretions of other people.' - Saki.

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hannahb83
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Re: News report: Care for those who self-harm needs improvin

Post by hannahb83 » Thu Jul 04, 2013 1:38 pm

Hi everyone,

Thank you for each of your responses and links! Beth, your personal experience has helped me see this issue from a different perspective, very interesting. Pink and will, cheers for those links I will be diving into those straight away!

Thank you again for your input, bye for now! :)
"Men are disturbed, not by things, but by the principles and notions which they form concerning things" - Epictetus

lakeland
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Re: News report: Care for those who self-harm needs improvin

Post by lakeland » Fri Jul 05, 2013 9:52 am

In the team I work in, every young person under 18 is seen by a CAMHS professional on the day that they are assessed as medically fit to be released from hospital. We carry out a comprehensive assessment, following the same format as we would for any new referral to the service.

After the assessment, if we feel their mental state is settled enough, the person is discharged from hospital and we offer a five day follow up at our base and decide at that stage whether the person requires further CAMHS input. If their mental state is not settled enough for discharge and there are concerns about further risk, we then begin the process of trying to find an inpatient bed so that the young person can be offered support in the safest environment. This is relatively rare in my experience.

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hannahb83
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Re: News report: Care for those who self-harm needs improvin

Post by hannahb83 » Tue Jul 09, 2013 4:13 pm

lakeland wrote:In the team I work in, every young person under 18 is seen by a CAMHS professional on the day that they are assessed as medically fit to be released from hospital. We carry out a comprehensive assessment, following the same format as we would for any new referral to the service.

After the assessment, if we feel their mental state is settled enough, the person is discharged from hospital and we offer a five day follow up at our base and decide at that stage whether the person requires further CAMHS input. If their mental state is not settled enough for discharge and there are concerns about further risk, we then begin the process of trying to find an inpatient bed so that the young person can be offered support in the safest environment. This is relatively rare in my experience.
Great to hear lakeland, and this is exactly why I think it is important to look at news reports like this one and consider the wider picture. A number of my class mates work for CAMHS in the east region, and had similar points to make.

Thanks for your input!
"Men are disturbed, not by things, but by the principles and notions which they form concerning things" - Epictetus

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