Relaxation and severe cognitive impairment

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faz121
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Joined: Sun Oct 10, 2010 2:34 pm

Relaxation and severe cognitive impairment

Post by faz121 » Wed Jan 16, 2013 1:58 pm

Hi,

I was wondering if anyone has any journal articles/experience of using relaxation with an individual with severe cognitive impairments? The person has an acquired brain injury so would be unable to self-initate the use of relaxation, but could be prompted to use relaxation techniques when agitated/distressed. I just wanted to know a bit more about the evidence base before embarking on a piece of clinical work.

Thanks

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PhineasGage
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Re: Relaxation and severe cognitive impairment

Post by PhineasGage » Wed Jan 16, 2013 4:59 pm

Hi faz121

Have you considered self-learning stategies? I know meditation is good, guided relaxation during Hypnotherapy can be very useful especially if they can learn from it, music therapy is another. There are lots of studies on these in brain injury, get googling :)
Some truths are too hard to know.

jamesivens
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Joined: Sat May 15, 2010 8:40 pm
Location: London

Re: Relaxation and severe cognitive impairment

Post by jamesivens » Wed Jan 16, 2013 5:35 pm

Hi, I hope this is of help.

Neuropsychological Rehabilitation by Barbara Wilson makes frequent reference to the use of relaxation techniques in the management of emotional disorders following head injury. It doesn't say however if its controlled muscle relaxation, visual imagery relaxation and the like.

I worked in an nhs neurorehab inpatient unit and by following the planned interventions from my supervisor, found that relaxation worked with the majority, if not all, the patients we saw with varying degrees of cog impairment and severe anxiety (as long as there was nothing medical reason which meant they could not participate, and they gave consent). Likewise the rehab assistant set up a relaxation group which was very popular among the patients.

It appeared to help the patients in lots of different ways e.g. before sleep, during physio exercises where there is a risk of falling, when agitated and so on.

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ems38
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Location: Glasgow

Re: Relaxation and severe cognitive impairment

Post by ems38 » Wed Jan 16, 2013 8:39 pm

Hello! I currently work in Brain Injury Rehabilitation. We use something called an emwave for people with cognitive impairments and anxiety issues which could be aided by relaxation. If you google it you should find some information on it. Im not sure what its reputation is but I have found it to be really helpful in aiding service users to de-escalate.

Hope that is of help to you :)

faz121
Posts: 33
Joined: Sun Oct 10, 2010 2:34 pm

Re: Relaxation and severe cognitive impairment

Post by faz121 » Wed Jan 16, 2013 11:52 pm

Thank you for the replies guys - it's all really helpful information for me to have a look into. Anecdotally, I know relaxation is helpful with acquired brain injury patients but I wanted some information on literature. You've certainly given me some avenues to explore. Thanks :)

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