ASD and psychosis

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Ruthie
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ASD and psychosis

Post by Ruthie » Fri Oct 24, 2008 1:57 pm

Does anyone know of any good books or articles about the links between autistic spectrum disorders and psychosis - or about how autistic traits can be mistaken for psychosis in certain circumstances?

Or does anyone have a perspective on it from their own experience? (Miriam...hint hint!)

Ta muchly!

Ruthie

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miriam
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Post by miriam » Fri Oct 24, 2008 9:29 pm

I can give you the contact details of a local service to us that specialises in this, but its not something I know too much about, as I only work with under 18s where psychosis is very rare (so in the last 10 years I've only met three kids who have symptoms that raised the issue of ASD/psychosis).
Miriam

See my blog at http://clinpsyeye.wordpress.com

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h2eau
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Post by h2eau » Sat Oct 25, 2008 12:22 am

Hi Ruthie

This is a particular area of interest for me and some of my own research has focused on the idea that there are similarities between people with Asperger syndrome and people with negative features of psychosis in terms of their theory of mind difficulties. However, I believe that these are qualitatively different, as such difficulties are transient in psychosis but stable in ASDs.

I would recommend taking a look at 'The Cognitive Neuropsychology of Schizophrenia' by Chris Frith (Uta Frith's husband). He has some interesting ideas about some of the behavioural and cognitive similarities underlying psychosis and ASD.

There is a chapter by Rhiannon Corcoran in the second edition of 'Understanding Other Minds - Perspectives from Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience' (edited by Simon Baron-Cohen, Helen Tager-Flusberg and Donald Cohen) that explores impaired theory of mind in people with psychosis with certain features, taking a symptom-oriented approach. This gives a nice summary of the research in this area.

On the flipside of the coin, emerging research suggests that some people with Asperger syndrome appear to exhibit paranoid ideation and delusions (Blackshaw et al., 2001; Abell & Hare, 2005). There is an interesting paper by Ryan (1992) that explores the idea that people with Asperger syndrome may be incorrectly diagnosed due to this presentation.

Its a really fascinating area!

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Kentucky_Freud_Chicken
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Post by Kentucky_Freud_Chicken » Sat Oct 25, 2008 5:25 pm

Hi fm, do you have the full references for the last 3 at all?

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h2eau
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Post by h2eau » Sat Oct 25, 2008 6:05 pm

Yeah, sure...they are:

Abell, F., & Hare, D.J. (2005). An experimental investigation of the phenomenology of delusional beliefs in people with Asperger syndrome. Autism, 9(5), 515-531.

Blackshaw, A.J., Kinderman, P., Hare, D.J., & Hatton, C. (2001). Theory of mind, causal attribution and paranoia in Asperger syndrome. Autism, 5(2), 147-163.

Ryan, R.M. (1992). Treatment-resistant chronic mental illness: Is it Asperger’s syndrome? Hospital and Community Psychiatry, 43( 8 ), 807-811.

Also check out Chris Frith and Rhiannon Corcoran's work looking at theory of mind in psychosis.

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Post by Ruthie » Sun Oct 26, 2008 5:28 pm

Thanks Miriam and fm27 those references are absolutely perfect :)

urmaserendipity85
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Re: ASD and psychosis

Post by urmaserendipity85 » Tue Nov 06, 2012 1:02 pm

Just wondering if anyone has any good references or advice on working with someone who has a diagnosis of Autism, mild learning disability and non-affective psychotic disorder? Just trying to decide if psychology can offer him anything that might work, over and above his medication. Or whether I can support the staff team to help him. Not sure he'd grasp the tradition CBT for psychosis package.
Thanks!

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