The PWP role

This section is for discussion relating to the Layard report, and subsequent schemes like Improving Access to Psychological Therapies where lower intensity inteventions are offered in primary care
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myotai
Posts: 36
Joined: Sun Mar 14, 2010 12:23 pm

The PWP role

Post by myotai » Fri Feb 10, 2017 3:34 pm

A simple question;

Does anyone have a really very positive experience of this role where they're supported, have a realistic and manageable caseload and only ever treat presentations that match those that they were taught and told they would be treating at University - presuming you have completed the PG Cert and not the 'top up' training that is.

Thanks,

M...

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myotai
Posts: 36
Joined: Sun Mar 14, 2010 12:23 pm

Re: The PWP role

Post by myotai » Sun Feb 12, 2017 8:22 am

<......tumbleweed......>

Not a single reply

That's very telling!

hsingh89
Posts: 42
Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 10:52 pm

Re: The PWP role

Post by hsingh89 » Mon Feb 20, 2017 1:52 pm

Hi Myotai,

I'd say I have definitely had a very positive time working as a PWP. I'd say the good supervision is key to this. Caseload is manageable, but I make sure I only work with someone whom I feel I can help, otherwise they have stepped up.

Whilst I see a lot of negativity regarding the IAPT role on this site (because a lot of services simply do not support their PWPs at all), there are a few services out there that do provide good support that make the role rewarding and fulfilling.

myotai
Posts: 36
Joined: Sun Mar 14, 2010 12:23 pm

Re: The PWP role

Post by myotai » Mon Feb 20, 2017 2:07 pm

Well, thats nice to hear.

However its a MASSIVE rarity to hear that its actually working - and I have to be honest I am hugely skeptical. I can't see how you can be in an IAPT service that works as you describe. Stepping up is such a rarity it might as well not be an option, and as for a manageable caseload...I have NEVER heard that before.

The PWP role in both services I have worked for and from the testimony of several people in three other services concur this.

How do you think your service has managed to find a way around the inherent exploitation of PWP's where others have failed?

M...

Ariel89
Posts: 12
Joined: Mon Mar 11, 2013 11:13 pm

Re: The PWP role

Post by Ariel89 » Mon Feb 20, 2017 10:31 pm

In answer to your questions in your initial post - yes.

I think a lot of the role is what you make it. I think there are services that are better, there are services that are worse, than others. It's a demanding role. Supervision is important. Resilience is important. There are so many things I've learnt, and love about being a PWP.

What is it about the role you dislike?
I find it disheartening that someone who works in the role feels so negatively about it.

Alex
Posts: 300
Joined: Tue Aug 23, 2011 10:01 pm

Re: The PWP role

Post by Alex » Tue Feb 21, 2017 12:27 am

The PWPs I have worked with did not often complain about their job. I noticed that the ones that had the most compassion for the clients fared better in the service and enjoyed their work more. As well as having boundaries with what was in their remit.

It sounds like you had a terrible time Myotai from your posts on the forum.

LIWY
Posts: 284
Joined: Wed Jun 02, 2010 9:13 am

Re: The PWP role

Post by LIWY » Wed Feb 22, 2017 12:31 am

I once worked in a service where the PWP job was manageable and the PWPs mostly happy. That service lost a tender for failing to reach access targets and became the type of factory that the OP describes. Where PWPs are happy it mostly seems that is because they know it is not a job for life and they are pleased to be getting experience to help them move on. Hence not a day goes by where you don't have dozens of PWP posts available on NHS jobs and locum rates for PWPs nearly match those for CBT therapists when comparing notes (experienced PWP £24 (up from about £15 per hour circa 2011) per hr versus new CBT therapist £27 per hr on the averages I have spoken to people about in London and SE).

My experience is rather the opposite of Alex's, those with most compassion often broke down over not being able to offer people the service they needed. Some of the most satisfied were unfortunately from what I saw those with so little experience of therapy and the therapeutic relationship that they believed that these cursory interventions were what people needed. Sorry if that offends some.

To my mind Step 2 has been a failed experiment that led to the removal of many counsellors yet it marches on and grows. It will need to grow some more until eventually it is demonstrated to be non-cost effective due to those who sustain recovery from Step 2 mostly being those who would have got their alone or those who don't relapsing at a high rate.

hsingh89
Posts: 42
Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 10:52 pm

Re: The PWP role

Post by hsingh89 » Wed Feb 22, 2017 5:33 pm

[quote="myotai"]Well, thats nice to hear.

However its a MASSIVE rarity to hear that its actually working - and I have to be honest I am hugely skeptical. I can't see how you can be in an IAPT service that works as you describe. Stepping up is such a rarity it might as well not be an option, and as for a manageable caseload...I have NEVER heard that before.

The PWP role in both services I have worked for and from the testimony of several people in three other services concur this.

How do you think your service has managed to find a way around the inherent exploitation of PWP's where others have failed?

M...[/quote]

To be honest, it's a case of not taking any cow dung from anyone that tries put work on you that you can't handle or deal with. When I first started in my service, they tried to put a massive caseload on me, but I bounce half that caseload back onto them mostly because they were not suitable for step 2 or not suitable for me (who was transferring services whilst still being a trainee).

Nowadays my service is pretty good in that as long as we hit our weekly contact targets, we're barely micro-managed in any way, so I'm made to feel like I have a high level of control in my role.

You have to speak up when you're not happy and acknowledge that you can turn around and say you're not comfortable working with someone because they don't fall in the Step 2 remit as Alex highlights. In some cases, I'll do step 2 interventions on a client and then step them up after 4-6 sessions which works fine for me.

Ariel89 has it right that supervision and resilience is important, especially when you feel like you want to "cure" *everything* that's distressing the client. I do find colleagues struggle with their own anxieties in this role, having supportive colleagues around I find so important.

nomnom
Posts: 254
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Location: Home

Re: The PWP role

Post by nomnom » Wed Feb 22, 2017 10:40 pm

My experience as a PWP has been mainly positive though comparable.

The service I trained in is known for high targets/caseload and though this pace was something new for me, it was the team and supervision they provided which made it possible. I thoroughly enjoyed my training and learning on the job. When I spoke to other trainees whose caseload was less than mine, they were always shocked at our numbers. But I think if you are trained in a rigorous environment but with a solid support structure around you, then you do enjoy the job.

I left the service for a charity organisation that has a stronger emphasis on team management and well-being but I moved for development and change more than anything else.

Whilst positive experiences might be rare, I do think they exist but it does vary across services which makes it hard to generalize.
'Forget what hurt you. But remember what it taught you'

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