Applying for Trainee PWP positions in 2019, do I stand a chance with my experience?

This section is for discussion relating to the Layard report, and subsequent schemes like Improving Access to Psychological Therapies where lower intensity inteventions are offered in primary care
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Coral1234
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Joined: Mon Dec 17, 2018 2:30 pm

Applying for Trainee PWP positions in 2019, do I stand a chance with my experience?

Post by Coral1234 » Sun Dec 30, 2018 4:15 pm

Hi everyone,

Just looking for a bit of advice. I want to apply for the trainee PWP course next year but not sure if I stand a chance of getting in, or even getting an interview!

A bit of background; I have a 2:1 in Psychology. I currently work as a Medical Receptionist in an urgent care centre, and have been in this role for 2 years, it is “just” an admin role but I do have to deal with individuals who may be experiencing mental ill health and offer them advice/signpost them. Being in a frontline role in the NHS means I have gained an understanding of how societal issues such as homelessness and financial issues impact health and mental health.

Around 2 years ago I experienced depression myself and was referred to my local IAPT. I received counselling which ended recently - so I am familiar with the service. I want to talk about my own experience in my supporting statement as I feel it allows me to relate to people who may be suffering similar in a deeper way.. Will this hold me back? I believe Sheffield uni’s entry requirements state that personal experience is beneficial. But I am worried that it will be off putting - despite having recovered.

I was offered the opportunity to be a volunteer peer mentor at iapt at the end of my counselling. I start my training next week.. I had my ‘interview’ recently and explained that my goal is to become a PWP, I was told I could access some shadowing so I hope this will be beneficial.

I work part time at the moment so want to fill the rest of my time volunteering at Iapt. By the time I apply I will have around 9 months experience as a volunteer. My other option is becoming a Samaritan which I would happily do but I’m torn between doing this on top of my peer mentoring or devoting all of my spare time to peer mentoring instead ....

I realise I have pretty much zero relevant experience but wanted some advice on whether I’d be wasting my time in applying or if I stand a chance? I’ve also been offered some volunteering work at Citizens advice which isn’t really relevant but is more of a Plan B if this doesn’t work out. It’s 8 hours per week which will be on top of my peer mentoring and paid job so wondering whether it will be worth doing.

What else could I do in the next year to enable me to stand a chance in applying? Thank you. :)

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MindfulPsych
Posts: 209
Joined: Sun Mar 08, 2015 11:33 am

Re: Applying for Trainee PWP positions in 2019, do I stand a chance with my experience?

Post by MindfulPsych » Thu Jan 03, 2019 1:42 pm

Coral1234 wrote:
Sun Dec 30, 2018 4:15 pm

Around 2 years ago I experienced depression myself and was referred to my local IAPT. I received counselling which ended recently - so I am familiar with the service. I want to talk about my own experience in my supporting statement as I feel it allows me to relate to people who may be suffering similar in a deeper way.. Will this hold me back? I believe Sheffield uni’s entry requirements state that personal experience is beneficial. But I am worried that it will be off putting - despite having recovered.

I was offered the opportunity to be a volunteer peer mentor at iapt at the end of my counselling. I start my training next week.. I had my ‘interview’ recently and explained that my goal is to become a PWP, I was told I could access some shadowing so I hope this will be beneficial.

I work part time at the moment so want to fill the rest of my time volunteering at Iapt. By the time I apply I will have around 9 months experience as a volunteer. My other option is becoming a Samaritan which I would happily do but I’m torn between doing this on top of my peer mentoring or devoting all of my spare time to peer mentoring instead ....

I realise I have pretty much zero relevant experience but wanted some advice on whether I’d be wasting my time in applying or if I stand a chance? I’ve also been offered some volunteering work at Citizens advice which isn’t really relevant but is more of a Plan B if this doesn’t work out. It’s 8 hours per week which will be on top of my peer mentoring and paid job so wondering whether it will be worth doing.

What else could I do in the next year to enable me to stand a chance in applying? Thank you. :)
Hi there,

It sounds like you have some experience so far which is good - The key to PWP applications is to be reflective on your experiences and show what you have learnt from them. It's important however, to show the real you.. especially in interviews!

You can certainly disclose your own personal experiences within IAPT but make sure you write about resilience now and how your experience will make you a good therapist... again be reflective.

There is no harm in applying for a trainee PWP post but I would try and gather some further experience too as a Health Care Assistant, Assistant Psychologist, Care worker etc. There are plenty of relevant jobs out there including what you are currently doing.

Wishing you good luck for your application - you can PM me if you have further questions!

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mungle
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Location: Midlands

Re: Applying for Trainee PWP positions in 2019, do I stand a chance with my experience?

Post by mungle » Thu Jan 03, 2019 5:50 pm

It sound reasonable that you could apply for a PWP role when 9 months into the peer mentoring and shadowing in IAPT. Do see the advice above about how you frame your personal experience.

However, don't be too disheartened if you don't get onto the PWP trainee role the first time/if it takes longer. Samaritans volunteering can be a great personal experience, as well as useful career-wise, but if you've identified that it would be too much on top of your job and the other volunteering role (this is understandable!) then don't feel that you need to. A great skill in a trainee CP is being able to reflect on your limits and self-care.

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