Locuming in IAPT as a newly qualified CP??

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TravelBug
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Locuming in IAPT as a newly qualified CP??

Post by TravelBug » Wed Jul 17, 2019 1:10 pm

Hi everyone,

I am soon to qualify as a CP and want to locum for the next 3 months before taking some time to travel.
My training has been very eclectic and I'm really looking to hone my CBT skills. I have been thinking more and more about locuming in IAPT which would hopefully achieve that, otherwise I'm considering HI training to help my competence (and confidence).

My question is whether you think as a locum there would be much capacity for supervisors to support my learning or whether one would expected to be highly competent given the amount services pay for locum staff, & thrown into the deep end with little supervision? I've not worked in IAPT during my training.

Any advice on this or even anyone's experience of choosing an area to locum in post-training would be really appreciated!

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miriam
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Re: Locuming in IAPT as a newly qualified CP??

Post by miriam » Wed Jul 17, 2019 2:29 pm

Services pay for locums to cover urgent deficits in their service. You are paid to meet that need, and not for your own CPD and development. So I'd expect minimal support and training, unless they want to (and believe they can) recruit you at the end of the short-term placement.

For context, I'm not a big fan of the locum system, as it seems to cost the NHS more for a worse service, as staff don't get long enough to know the context/service/team/clients and more money ends up in agency owner pockets.

But I'm curious why you'd feel the need to gain either skills or experience in CBT at the end of clinical training. Is it some form of imposter syndrome or self-doubt? Or a genuine deficit in a course that is supposed to prepare you for autonomous working and ensure you are competent in CBT and other therapeutic models? Either way, I'd encourage you to discuss that with your course and supervisor.
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alexh
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Re: Locuming in IAPT as a newly qualified CP??

Post by alexh » Fri Jul 19, 2019 12:21 pm

My impression when I have visited some IAPT services or when CPs who work in them spoke to our training cohort about their roles, is that they can have high expectations of their CPs. I did not think it would be a good fit for me to have a lot of potentially experienced CBT therapists looking 'up' at me for guidance as I also had and have continuing doubts about my CBT skills. I also think CP's newly qualified banding can set up a difficult dynamic.

I'd also suspect there is some self-doubt and impostorship remaining that you could explore. I thought that was par for the course to be honest.

Maybe you could look for services that are willing to support a newly qualified CP and who are understanding of your current situation and confidence level: that you have left training with some doubts about your CBT skills and that these may need support. Certainly worth an informal chat prior to application or interview to see what the service and supervisors expectations are of their new recruit. Are they willing to support you through these doubts or are they looking for someone different.

I did meet a couple of CPs during training who had chosen to locum after finishing to continue broadening their experience, they said, definitely not about the money :).

bluegoat
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Re: Locuming in IAPT as a newly qualified CP??

Post by bluegoat » Wed Aug 07, 2019 5:32 am

I personally think that given you have completed a course that doesn't legally require you to work for the NHS / public sector for a number of years (essentially, to pay back your training), you are (and should feel free) to do whatever you want, locum or otherwise. If nothing else, it allows you to dip your toes into a qualified role in different settings and then decide what interests you more and you feel comfortable in.

Having said that, a lot of people of fall into this trap that now you are (nearly) a qualified applied psychologist (clinical, counselling, health, whatever else it may be) you should really know how to do it. There's an element of truth in that you should be able to deliver safe clinical practice, however, don't expect to be an expert in everything. A Clinical Psychology colleague of mine once said to me that she continues to feel like a jack of all trades and master of none, and, rightly so, she spent a few years training and working in her preferred modality. It does take some (necessary) time of consolidation after graduation, nothing wrong with that. (By the by point: In my view Clinical Psychology owes its success and predominance partly to the disillusion that courses are instilling on their graduates that they are expects, know everything, they are the better than all the other applied psychologists, etc, so be mindful of that! In my experience Clinical Psychologists are, by far, the most confident and self-assured practitioners compared to every other applied psychologist I've met).

In summary: be kind to yourself and do what feels right for you. It may or not turn out to be the right thing, but either way it'll be useful information.

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Spatch
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Re: Locuming in IAPT as a newly qualified CP??

Post by Spatch » Wed Aug 07, 2019 8:30 am

By the by point: In my view Clinical Psychology owes its success and predominance partly to the disillusion that courses are instilling on their graduates that they are expects, know everything, they are the better than all the other applied psychologists, etc, so be mindful of that! In my experience Clinical Psychologists are, by far, the most confident and self-assured practitioners compared to every other applied psychologist I've met.
Interesting point. Although we have our fair share of imposter syndrome/I-am-not-an-expert types, I have noticed this in some trainees and qualifieds (and have on occasion had this attributed to me). I wondered if this was due to something inherent in the training of some courses, the range of experience typically needed before getting onto training or something in surviving the selection process. Or it could be how the profession is externally constructed and viewed, as well as the percieved mystique of it?

From a personal perspective, I think my own confidence is based on a mix of having a fair awareness of my individual strengths and weaknesses, being shown how to tolerate and use criticism, and surviving some fairly horrific early career experiences and still being around to tell the tale.
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hettie
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Re: Locuming in IAPT as a newly qualified CP??

Post by hettie » Wed Aug 07, 2019 10:10 am

I wondered if this was due to something inherent in the training of some courses, the range of experience typically needed before getting onto training or something in surviving the selection process. Or it could be how the profession is externally constructed and viewed, as well as the percieved mystique of it?

I have noticed something interesting about aspiring clinical psychologists- it is seen as incredibly difficult and competitive to get onto training. It can therefore attract a very aspiring (dare I say it slightly perfectionist type) person for whom it is all about the succeeding as the goal. It appears that this cohort have thought less about actually being a CP and or the training journey. I dare say they are the cohort that also ‘fail’ at getting onto training (not being very reflective and all that), but perhaps some do? However, I’m not sure this is unique to clinical psychologists. I have recently been on a leadership training with a bunch of (mainly) medics. Most of them are applying for consultant posts and are well established in their specialisms. They have been very open (partly because the leadership training required them to be reflective!) about their confidence and self-assurance and their often-underlying anxieties and perfectionist tendencies. We have discussed the NHS/medic culture and there is clearly something about how professions are constructed and protected that is not entirely helpful. Interestingly their perception of psychologists is of noodling thoughtfulness that can sometimes come off as lack of decision making and leadership (something I have seen at senior psychology leadership, but likewise I have known clear and decisive psychological leadership).

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