dual registered psychologists

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Such_a_lovely_girl
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dual registered psychologists

Post by Such_a_lovely_girl » Thu Apr 06, 2017 2:49 pm

if you are a psychologist who is dually registered (for instance a forensic and clinical psychologist) did you need to undertake both full training courses or could you apel over any parts of our learning?

I ask this as I am a trainee but when I quality would like to apply for the certificate of competence in educational training to give me the option of doing both therapy and psychometric assessment with children for both health and educational purposes. I did wonder and am really torn between working within a camhs setting/child development centre/autism assessment (my aim is to specialise in working with children and families with developmental delay) but I'd also consider working for (and have been absolutely blown away by) the local authority advisory teams for children in education with mental health needs and looked after children. The consultations they have given to social workers and school staff have been amazing (was lucky enough to go to a few of these on placement). Is it possible for someone to be a dual registered psychologist for instance clinical and educational? Forensic/clinical? If yes, how did you manage this? Or can, or do any of you work within the charity sector, local authority etc after having some time working in or alongside working in the NHS? If yes I would like to hear about your experiences!

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Loula
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Re: dual registered psychologists

Post by Loula » Thu Apr 06, 2017 4:39 pm

Birmingham offer a forensic clincial psychology doctorate over 4 years which confers dual registration.

There has been some discussion about a broader role of 'child psychologists' to take into account some of the overlap between clinical and educational psychology. There was a recent bps paper on it that has been discussed on here before https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&sourc ... bmUSYRJ94g

I can't comment on the dual educational/ clinical route as that's not my area, but as a CP who has worked exclusively in forensic settings (prison and secure hospitals) since qualifying, I don't think I would see any benefit to being dual trained, especially given the time/ expense of training in forensics, and that I would rather spend the time/ money on more focussed post-qualification training. I've never come across anyone who has dual trained, but I'm sure some do exist.

lakeland
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Re: dual registered psychologists

Post by lakeland » Thu Apr 06, 2017 4:57 pm

In my experience, a lot of the dual qualified forensic / clinical psychologists got their forensic chartership through the old route, which seemed to involve two years supervised practice under a forensic psychologist. Obviously this isn't the way people get chartered any more, so it would involve a lot more work for (imho) little additional benefit.

Such_a_lovely_girl
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Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2010 11:49 pm

Re: dual registered psychologists

Post by Such_a_lovely_girl » Thu Apr 06, 2017 6:45 pm

I have to say I am one of the few (reading that paper) who would love to be an 0-25 psychologist. I can't think of anything that would suit me better. I really did consider educational psychology but that would mean closing out the nhs, do clinical and it closes the local authority door. It is something that exists in the usa (you can do a 5 year child/school psychology training) and for me that would be ideal although long but so worth any sacrifice. I do wonder as I came from children's primary mental health and I think will go back to this as a band 7 on qualifying and I think, with all its consultation and training, psychologists have sooooo much to offer this area. My biggest fear was that going down the EP route, I would have loved it for a time but so many amazing opportunities in the NHS will be closed off. Looking at the band 7 posts out there now, as well as being a CP, I can be the autism liaison lead for the camhs team, i can also work in early years mental health, a CDC, a senior primary mental health worker for targeted mental health in schools.....and more, and I will have a fantastic skills set to bring to all of those roles. So no regrets on that front....but as I said, I was blown away by the consultation skills of the EP's working in the looked after children's team.

Does any one else agree/feel this way? This is to take nothing from the 70% of psychologists who work with adults, and all of those who want to keep options open. I worked for many years as an early years teacher and will be 37 when I qualify; I had a good idea of what kind of psychologist I wanted to be before I started training. In an ideal world I'd love to have the freedoms to do consultation work with schools, therapy with children, assessment of neurodevelopmental disabilities, training of healthcare staff on mental health and developmental delay. I'd love the chance to have placements in children's services (social care), the local authority and the NHS. I'd even love it if I could mix it up a bit and work for 2 employers doing 2 really different things for part of the week. I just wondered if anyone else ever felt this way? People seem to be either/or but never both. Also, you mentioned about post qualification training which is a good point. do you have any suggestions how, with hpcp registration, you could exploit your qualification so that it opens doors rather than closes them?

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miriam
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Re: dual registered psychologists

Post by miriam » Thu Apr 06, 2017 11:18 pm

I've done lots of work in social care settings and teams (as have several other clinical psychologists who post here), and most of the LAC work in every area I have worked in has come from CPs rather than EPs - with many of us employed by local authorities or contracted into joined up health and social care teams. In fact there are some 300+ CPs in the national network for CPs working with LAAC, that I was chair of for many years, whereas very few EPs I have met in my career to date have had a LAC specialism (and none have had it to the exclusion of doing statutory work). Likewise I know lots of CPs who have done consultancy and training in schools, as well as offering direct therapy. So to my mind I am really puzzled what you would want to do that isn't open to you as a CP!
Miriam

See my blog at http://clinpsyeye.wordpress.com

Such_a_lovely_girl
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Re: dual registered psychologists

Post by Such_a_lovely_girl » Sun Apr 09, 2017 9:02 pm

bless you Miriam. Just what I wanted to hear! Thank you muchly

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