AP job - unusual circumstances? is this normal?

Your chance to ask for advice on any aspect of career development that doesn't fit in any of the above categories
Post Reply
Opetha
Posts: 16
Joined: Sun Aug 19, 2018 3:01 pm

AP job - unusual circumstances? is this normal?

Post by Opetha » Sat Aug 25, 2018 3:46 pm

Hi Everyone,

I went for a job interview for an AP position recently, but didn't get the job. However, I wanted to ask you guys what you think of the job, whether it sounds unusual and what your thoughts are.

I'll keep it anonymous as possible.

The job was working as an AP for a private limited company. The company only has two staff members, the Clinical Psychologist, who is also the director, and the assistant psychologist. The salary was advertised as 18k which I believe is slightly lower than an NHS Band 4 AP salary.

The administrative base is an office attached to the Directors home. However most of the work would be conducted remotely, driving to various locations in the region to conduct psychometric tests etc.

As I said, I didn't get the job anyway, but afterwards I gave it some thought and I wondered whether i'd have found that a difficult role, whether i'd have felt unsupported or isolated.

I am admittedly very new to this scene. I havn't had any other interviews for AP jobs yet, so I don't know how typical this is.

Can I ask your thoughts? Is this a not unusual situation? Are there increasingly small private employers looking to take on an AP? Do you think the job would have been difficult for someone who hasn't worked the AP role before?

Advertisement
Pearson Clinical Assessment publishes a wide range of assessments to support psychology professionals including the Gold Standard Wechsler range. To view our range please visit: pearsonclinical.co.uk/cpf
User avatar
maven
Site Admin
Posts: 2149
Joined: Sat Mar 24, 2007 9:00 pm

Re: AP job - unusual circumstances? is this normal?

Post by maven » Sun Aug 26, 2018 7:40 pm

If its the job I think it is, then its an awesome job with a great supervisor who used to be a service lead in the NHS. You do get to interact with clients and professionals in a set up like that, but by nature it is more isolated than being part of a bigger team. It would definitely be a great step before getting an NHS AP position, but you'd need to be quite proactive and self-reliant compared to an NHS or large-service AP. I think different roles suit different people, so it may not have been your thing, but it would be a great learning experience in many other ways.
Maven.

Wise men talk because they have something to say, fools because they have to say something - Plato
The fool thinks himself to be wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool - Shakespeare

User avatar
BlueCat
Site Admin
Posts: 2844
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2007 2:42 pm

Re: AP job - unusual circumstances? is this normal?

Post by BlueCat » Mon Aug 27, 2018 6:31 pm

There have always been jobs like this, and as the health and social care world becomes increasingly based on external procurement and purchasing, there will be more and more and more - both like this one where the bulk of the work is assessment, and others, where therapeutic services are also offered. You are right to think carefully - some of these roles are really well supported, working with excellent and supportive clinical psychologists; whereas others could be considered to be stretching assistant psychologists outside of what would be considered reasonable (e.g. carrying a large therapeutic caseload independently).

The nature of each small company will be different, and my advice would be to ask lots and lots of questions prior to interview, visit if possible, to check out what would be the balance of work, what formal and informal supervisory contact there would be, what the first month, three months, six months targets would be, perhaps what a "typical" week might look like, what CPD opportunities/support there would be.....etc.....

Some/many of these types of roles will be excellent first steps towards NHS AP roles (private companies tend to be easier to gain work with, as there tend to be less applicants), and a few will perhaps be a little tricky. I wouldn't suggest you dismiss these types of role out of hand, but would suggest you do your research beforehand, especially if it is a very small business.
There's no such thing as bad weather, just the wrong clothes. Billy Connolly.

User avatar
miriam
Site Admin
Posts: 7657
Joined: Sat Mar 24, 2007 11:20 pm
Location: Bucks
Contact:

Re: AP job - unusual circumstances? is this normal?

Post by miriam » Mon Aug 27, 2018 6:41 pm

The other tip is to ask to speak to the previous post holder, if there is one, to get a feel of whether you think the potential supervisor is going to be a supportive and inspiring role model, and as Bluecat says, you should have a chance to ask more about what the role would involve day to day.
Miriam

See my blog at http://clinpsyeye.wordpress.com

Opetha
Posts: 16
Joined: Sun Aug 19, 2018 3:01 pm

Re: AP job - unusual circumstances? is this normal?

Post by Opetha » Tue Aug 28, 2018 6:09 pm

A big thank you to each of you who kindly responded to my post. I really do appreciate it.

Maven, I did get a really good 'feeling' from the Clinical psychologist, very approachable and warm.

I think I may have found the isolative elements of this work challenging, not due to any deep social need, but more for the reassurance of having someone else around to ask a question of, if I became really stuck. I admittedly have problems with self esteem and self confidence, so it can be difficult for me to discern whether my reservations about certain things are based in anxiety or a genuine identification of a problem!

Again, I want to thank you all for your replies. It has given me things to think about and I will be especially conscious to do a lot of research regarding future roles.

Many Thanks,
O.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 8 guests