How many years after graduation before you got on the course

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How many years after you graduated from your psychology degree did you get a place on training?

Zero (straight from undergrad)
6
1%
1 year
21
4%
2 years
70
12%
3 years
121
21%
4 years
110
19%
5 years
75
13%
6 years
60
11%
7 years
42
7%
8+ years
63
11%
 
Total votes: 568

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Ruthie
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How many years after graduation before you got on the course

Post by Ruthie » Tue Apr 06, 2010 10:53 am

After Bluecat's suggestion, here's another poll!

I think this is also going to be biased. Some people know they want to do clinical training from before they graduate, others decide a few (or even many) years down the line. The truly masochistic go off and do PhDs and such like before applying.

Still, it will be an interesting poll!

Ruthie

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BlueCat
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Post by BlueCat » Tue Apr 06, 2010 11:35 am

So should we do a poll called "how many years after you graduated (or after you decided you wanted to do clinical psychology, whichever is later) did you get a place on training? :lol:

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Batfish
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Post by Batfish » Tue Apr 06, 2010 12:43 pm

This is interesting to me since I am partly one of those masachists ( MSc and PhD) and partly one of those who didn't feel ready earlier as discussed elsewhere...part of the reason I did the further study first. I'm now applying for the first time, graduated 8 years ago this September and am therefore a bit older than the average applicant....although I like to see that as valuable life experience!

For all that I was invited for all four interviews and have had two so far with two reserve list places in both. I can't vote in either poll as I haven't been offered a place anywhere but I feel I've learned so much for next year if I have to apply again. I've learned a lot about my strengths and weaknesses with regards to my application and my interview technique, but I've also learned a lot about just how the interviews are, and the kind of questions and answers that I'd like to give - often with hindsight. All in all it's been a very valuable learning exerience, yet a hugely difficult and stressful one that I'm not sure I'd want to do if I wasn't completely sure about my career direction.

missm
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Post by missm » Tue Apr 06, 2010 1:27 pm

Your story resonates very much with mine Batfish. I also completed an MSc and am currently in the writing-up stage of my PhD. I graduated 8 years ago also and this was my 1st time applying, with 2 interviews out of 4 and 2 reserve list offers. Similar to yourself, I've found the whole experience very valuable and if I do apply again next year, I think it will feel less daunting and I'll have a much better idea of what to expect at interviews etc. It has been stressful at times and I completely neglected my PhD for about three weeks :shock: Anyway, just thought I'd add my tuppence worth!

missm
x

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Batfish
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Post by Batfish » Tue Apr 06, 2010 2:24 pm

Hiya missm

thanks for posting, it's great to hear that someone else is in the same boat as me with similar experinces. Lots of luck with your reserve lists, hope you get the place you want. I'm also at the very end of writing up, here's to getting through submission and viva on top of all this :) x

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sv650biker
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Post by sv650biker » Tue Apr 06, 2010 6:51 pm

I graduated in 2007 and im yet to get on the course...I have not done an MSC or PHD though so I wonder if I am at a disadvantage already compared to the higher calibre of applicants i.e. tho who have done a masters/PHD etc..

I guess only time will tell :)

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loopylisa
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Post by loopylisa » Tue Apr 06, 2010 7:11 pm

sv650biker wrote:I graduated in 2007 and im yet to get on the course...I have not done an MSC or PHD though so I wonder if I am at a disadvantage already compared to the higher calibre of applicants i.e. tho who have done a masters/PHD etc..

I guess only time will tell :)
i wonder the same thing but im hoping the nrly 5 yrs of clinical experience inc 2 ap posts, gmhw and ug placement yr that i will have accrued by next yr will help :D
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Batfish
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Post by Batfish » Tue Apr 06, 2010 7:17 pm

Oh I'm pretty sure that those of us with PhDs are in the minority. Also, I found at interviews that my biggest strengths are, understandably, in the academic parts, whilst it sounds like yours will be in the clinical aspects. We all have our stronger areas and less strong areas depending on experience, just that these differ for different people.

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sv650biker
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Post by sv650biker » Tue Apr 06, 2010 10:05 pm

loopylisa wrote:
i wonder the same thing but im hoping the nrly 5 yrs of clinical experience inc 2 ap posts, gmhw and ug placement yr that i will have accrued by next yr will help :D
Oh Im sure it will, thats a hefty slice of experience there! :D
Batfish wrote:We all have our stronger areas and less strong areas depending on experience, just that these differ for different people.
Yup, I agree with you there batfish!

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BlueCat
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Post by BlueCat » Wed Apr 07, 2010 7:37 pm

Interesting - this is a really different distribution to the how many times did you apply. Kep the votes coming guys!
There's no such thing as bad weather, just the wrong clothes. Billy Connolly.

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spongebob
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Post by spongebob » Thu Apr 08, 2010 3:36 pm

I just realised that working out the best way to plot the relationship between years experience and number of times applying, predicting how it might look and what it may mean is not particularly good use of my time…interesting though :lol:

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katja
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Post by katja » Thu Apr 08, 2010 3:58 pm

Batfish
I'm now applying for the first time, graduated 8 years ago this September and am therefore a bit older than the average applicant....although I like to see that as valuable life experience!
I always thought the average age of trainees getting onto training was 27* with 3 years experience but I wonder if this is another of these 'myths'. I await the poll with interest.


*Of course you may have (like my good self :wink: ) a life before psychology which would make you older.
It only ends once. Everything that comes before is just progress.
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Neno123
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Post by Neno123 » Tue May 11, 2010 9:31 pm

I am 31 and have been offered 2 places this year on my 4th attempt. It has obviously been a good number of years since I graduated (a full decade in fact) but I did not decide to apply myself properly to getting on the clinical course until about 5 or 6 years ago.

I had an interview the first year I applied and messed it up due to nerves. This year I really feel that being that bit older (wiser???!) helped in terms of managing myself and being comfortable in my own skin. Having that extra 'life experience' really made a difference I think and helped me to realise that the course is not the be all and end all that I used to think it was. There are other avenues and other things in life that take priority and I think this came across in my interviews, i.e. the feelings of desparation that I think can be present in a lot of interviewees just was not there for me. It is this I believe that made the difference for me!!

I guess my message is don't give up hope. Resilience is the buzz word but there also comes a time when you begin to resign yourself to never getting on. It can be then that you are successful, like I was. This was probably going to be my last year of applying, and I had made other plans, hence the lack of desparation. What do you know, I've been successful at long last!

The whole process is a long and awful one, so keep smiling and just think of the experienced, well-rounded person you will be by the time you get on! :D

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BlueCat
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Re: How many years after graduation before you got on the co

Post by BlueCat » Mon Feb 28, 2011 4:39 pm

In response to recent discussion on the forum and in live chat, I think this poll will be interesting/helpful to dispel some myths around "first time successes" and "number of years servied". There may also be people who have gained a place on training since the poll began who may be able to add to it. For people who are still working towards a training place, I believe you can view the results of the poll by clicking on "view results" (or something of that nature) above.
There's no such thing as bad weather, just the wrong clothes. Billy Connolly.

ElizabethB
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Re: How many years after graduation before you got on the co

Post by ElizabethB » Mon Feb 28, 2011 5:10 pm

Crikey- I graduated from my undergraduate psychology degree in 2003, so if I by some miracle I managed to obtain a place this year, I will be looking at 8 years + post graduation!! :shock: :oops: (but that's because of postgrad qualifications)
Last edited by ElizabethB on Mon Feb 28, 2011 5:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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