Questions about a Masters...

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Gilly
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Questions about a Masters...

Post by Gilly » Thu Sep 10, 2009 11:13 pm

..Which isnt "strictly" psychological..

Ive seen this Masters at the Institute of Psychiatry:
http://www.iop.kcl.ac.uk/sites/neuroscience/?id=53

and whilst im already undertaking an MSc Research Methods tihs year, this course has interested me greatly - my future ambition is in neuropsychology, and just reading about this course made me damn my poorness, but would there be much point in me taking it, from a career building point of view (aside from just pure interest)

Would this be viewed as beneficial to a CP, or is it something that wouldnt really count for much.

Thanks in advance!

-Gilly

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Re: Questions about a Masters...

Post by ElizabethB » Fri Sep 11, 2009 3:50 pm

Gilly. wrote:..Which isnt "strictly" psychological..

Ive seen this Masters at the Institute of Psychiatry:
http://www.iop.kcl.ac.uk/sites/neuroscience/?id=53

and whilst im already undertaking an MSc Research Methods tihs year, this course has interested me greatly - my future ambition is in neuropsychology, and just reading about this course made me damn my poorness, but would there be much point in me taking it, from a career building point of view (aside from just pure interest)

Would this be viewed as beneficial to a CP, or is it something that wouldnt really count for much.

Thanks in advance!

-Gilly
Hi Gilly,

Looks like a great course- although a little beyond me I think!



How does the neuropsychology field work? It's unlike forensic and health psychology as I don't think you can be a chartered neuropsychologist?? or maybe I'm wrong!

I think neuropsychology overlaps with clinical psychology quite a bit- so I do feel that it is relevant, thinking in terms of memory impairments for example with clinical populations. If you took the neuropsych MSc you would have specialised skills in the area which would, I think help with your DClinPsych application (if you decided to go for it). Most people do not have an MSc in neuropsychology (probably because it's not exactly an easy subject- although I'm not advocating that any MSc is easy by any means!!!) so your application would probably stand out from the rest of MScs out there.

Also, I don't think you necessarily get additional points on the academic side of things in ranking forms for having more than one MSc (that's just what I've come across anyway!).

Taking on a second MSc is not something I would recommend however (in terms of the resouces it will take up)

Hope this helps!

xxx
Last edited by ElizabethB on Wed Oct 21, 2009 8:50 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by h2eau » Fri Sep 11, 2009 4:06 pm

How does the neuropsychology field work? It's unlike forensic and health psychology as I don't think you can be a chartered neuropsychologist?? or maybe I'm wrong!
As I understand it, you can work in neuropsychology settings as a clinical psychologist but you can also do further training to qualify as (what was formerly known as) a Chartered Clinical Neuropsychologist. I am unsure if there is a HPC equivalent title for this yet.

The Careers section of the BPS website states:

"To become a Practitioner Full Member of the Division of Neuropsychology you will need:

* Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC, previously called GBR) via an accredited degree or an accredited conversion course
* Accredited postgraduate training programme that gives eligibility for membership as a Chartered Psychologist through the Clinical or Educational training route
* The Society's Practitioner Full Membership Qualification in Neuropsychology

Those that have completed accredited postgraduate training in Clinical Neuropsychology will be eligible for exemption from part of the Society's Practitioner Full Membership Qualification. "

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Re: Questions about a Masters...

Post by Ripley » Sat Sep 12, 2009 1:39 pm

Gilly. wrote:..Which isnt "strictly" psychological..

Ive seen this Masters at the Institute of Psychiatry:
http://www.iop.kcl.ac.uk/sites/neuroscience/?id=53

and whilst im already undertaking an MSc Research Methods tihs year, this course has interested me greatly - my future ambition is in neuropsychology, and just reading about this course made me damn my poorness, but would there be much point in me taking it, from a career building point of view (aside from just pure interest)

Would this be viewed as beneficial to a CP, or is it something that wouldnt really count for much.

Thanks in advance!

-Gilly
I just got accepted onto that course for september 2010! The place is amazing, and the admissions guy (John Stephenson) said he was currently updating the site to interpret the new modules. There is quite a bit of emphasis on psychological theories in one of the main modules. I'm taking it just because the course interests me, and neuropsychology was the most interesting part of my BSc psychology degree.

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Post by Gilly » Mon Sep 14, 2009 2:52 pm

aye, from my understanding, after the DClinPsych, you undergo further training under the watchful eye of a consultant clinical neuropsychologist, to become a neuropsychologist. Its currently not a protected title under the HPC (which im hoping will change soon), which is a trifle irritating.

Elizabeth, you say that you wouldnt recomend a second masters, is that just because of the time and money (which could potentially be used to get an AP position, for example?) - or does the now increased job net make up for it?

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Post by Gilly » Mon Sep 21, 2009 11:11 am

Image

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Post by Gilly » Thu Oct 01, 2009 6:49 pm

sorry to be annoying, but any chance of getting the opinion of any of the CPs?

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Post by Ruthie » Thu Oct 01, 2009 7:28 pm

Hmmmm - I am not sure tbh. I think that it probably won't help your application to the course in terms of getting on versus not getting beyond your current masters degree. You've got the academic skills so I guess what you need to think about are the more clinical skills and experiences.

However, I do know CPs who have done MScs in neuropsychology after qualifying in order to build their expertise in that area so it might be something to pursue after training. That's also more specific to neuropsychology, rather than neuroscience so would perhaps be of more relevance. Perhaps specialising in neuropsychology after training is something to think about after you've done the general training.

Of course, when you do your DClin training, you can often develop additional skills in neurospsych along the way. There's always been plenty of neuropsych work on all but one of my placements (a specialist therapy placement in IAPT). If you wanted to focus on neuropsych, you could request it on your placements and do a specialist neuropsych placement in your final year.

Having said all that, I think postgrad study is something that can and should be done for the love of it and that there is no race to get on the DClin. That MSc won't hinder your chances at all and perhaps you'll just spend the year loving it and enjoying it and that is no loss! You can bring that knowledge and skill to any future AP posts, trainee placements and newly qualified positions and that can be very valuable. I would want to think carefully about the time and finances that you would need to invest to do it and whether that is worth it. If you think it is for the love of it and the skills it would give you, then I would go for it.

Ruthie (nearly a CP so not sure if that counts!)

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Post by ElizabethB » Thu Oct 01, 2009 7:48 pm

Gilly. wrote:aye, from my understanding, after the DClinPsych, you undergo further training under the watchful eye of a consultant clinical neuropsychologist, to become a neuropsychologist. Its currently not a protected title under the HPC (which im hoping will change soon), which is a trifle irritating.

Elizabeth, you say that you wouldnt recomend a second masters, is that just because of the time and money (which could potentially be used to get an AP position, for example?) - or does the now increased job net make up for it?
Hi Gilly,

Sorry I realised that I did not reply to your question! :oops:

I think I was referring to doing one MSc straight after another-
Last edited by ElizabethB on Wed Oct 21, 2009 8:49 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by miriam » Thu Oct 01, 2009 8:16 pm

The short answer is that you should only do it if you are super-interested in it and want to do it for that reason, as it is unlikely to add much to your application compared to getting other forms of experience when you already have an MSc.
Miriam

See my blog at http://clinpsyeye.wordpress.com

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Post by Spatch » Sat Oct 03, 2009 9:26 am

From the viewpoint of another of the qualifed/

That particular MSc Neuroscience is really good and I know about 5 or so people that did it and ended up on Clinical Training. Although I never technically enrolled on it as an official student, I sat in on a lot of the lectures and met lots of the students and there was a mix of medics, psychology grads and other more traditional scientists.

I have found it helpful to inform my own neuropsych practice, and when I started clinical training the knowledge I gained made me feel more reflective about what may actually be happening at a biological/ structural level as well as the functional observations.

However, if you already have an MSc a second one is not going to win additional "points" on any application, and may actually send out a negative message depending on whoever is recruiting. Also this MSc does not actually lead to another area of chartership like forensic, health etc so that may be something to think about.

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