Declaration of MH-Related Problems in an Application

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Purplebear
Posts: 26
Joined: Wed Mar 25, 2015 12:56 pm

Declaration of MH-Related Problems in an Application

Post by Purplebear » Sun Oct 16, 2016 5:32 pm

I was wondering what people thought of this one. I recently wrote an application in which I declared using CBT techniques with myself in order to overcome OCD-related problems. I wrote it in order to express how highly I thought of CBT/why I really wanted the job/level of understanding of CBT. My partner had a read over my application and queried whether that was a good thing to share or not. I didn't go into any great depth - it was only a brief paragraph. What do people think? Was that a good or bad move?

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Alexander
Posts: 291
Joined: Tue Aug 04, 2009 11:19 pm

Re: Declaration of MH-Related Problems in an Application

Post by Alexander » Sat Oct 22, 2016 10:00 am

I have been cautioned by several psychologists to think carefully about disclosing MHPs in applications. They did not say it should not be done but expressed the importance of doing so in a way that doesn't undermine your ability to do the job for which you are applying. I have mentioned past childhood difficulties in an application. The final version was watered down to be very vague, following feedback from my supervisor.

Purplebear
Posts: 26
Joined: Wed Mar 25, 2015 12:56 pm

Re: Declaration of MH-Related Problems in an Application

Post by Purplebear » Mon Oct 24, 2016 9:14 am

The particular things I mentioned were some OCD symptoms that I managed using self-help CBT (i.e. nothing too debilitating/nothing that warranted accessing services in my case). The main point of sharing was to show understanding/skills in this area that were relevant to the job. This was in an application for a trainee PWP position. Interestingly, the PWP position itself asked for lived experience of MHPs in the "desirable" criteria (I had a look at the person spec for both the trainee and trained positions). I'm not sure how it would be looked on, but in the interest of being genuine in the application, I thought it was worth sharing.

It's an odd one isn't it, a I feel it shouldn't really warrant a judgement that someone might not be able to cope with a job, as there are plenty of people out there in extremely high-level professions, very high functioning, who do have concurrent MHPs. And I've not met a single person working in mental health yet who doesn't have something going on for them in that way. It's interesting that you had experience of being (kind of) discouraged from sharing. Maybe a bit of stigma there? But I agree the way in which it is shared matters and it has to show that it would enhance rather than undermine job performance.

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